RESOURCES ON CAMPUS



The CED Undergraduate Advising Office is open for drop-in appointments. Here is this week's schedule:



Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
10 am - 12 pm
Omar,
Heather
No Drop-In
Susan
Isela
No Drop-In
No Drop-In
1 pm - 4 pm
Susan
Isela
Isela Omar
Susan
Omar
Heather
No Drop-In
Isela
Heather
image.png
Thursday, September 5, 5:00-7:30
MLK Jr Student Union, Pauley Ballroom, 3rd Floor  
Network with the Big Four and other accounting firms recruiting for full-time opportunities, summer internships, and leadership programs (for frosh/soph)
At least 11 firms will be participating including BDO, Crowe, EY, KPMG, Moss Adams, PwC, and more...All majors welcome.  
Professional Business Attire recommended
View the employer directory on Handshake
image.png
Thursday, August 29, 5:00-8:00
MLK Jr Student Union, Pauley Ballroom, 3rd Floor 
Network with representatives from prestigious consulting firms to learn about full time and summer internship opportunities
44 participating companies represent strategy consulting as well as niche consulting, including finance, technical/IT, healthcare, life sciences, economics and litigation, big data analytics, human resources, and many other functional and industry areas.
In addition to our fair sponsor, Alvarez & Marsal, participating firms include Accenture, EY-Parthenon, FTI Consulting, L.E.K. Consulting, Willis Towers Watson, ZS Associates, and many others... All majors welcome.  
Professional Business Attire recommended
View the employer directory on Handshake

Satellite Advising Flyer Fall 2019 (2).png



COURSE OFFERINGS

Conversion and Negotiation
 Todd P. Olson (History of Art) Ivonne del Valle (Spanish and Portuguese)
TTh 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM
BAM/PFA Art Museum Auditorium 
4 Units
History of Art C110 (class number 32898)
Spanish and Portuguese C110 (class number 32778) 

Breadth: Arts and Literature, Historical Studies
The concept of conversion is regularly employed to refer to changing religions; one leaves a set of beliefs and practices to adopt new ones is the context in which it is most commonly used. This process can be personal or historical, involve a single individual or entire groups, such as at the moment of conquest and colonization of the Americas, when thousands of indigenous people were forcibly or willingly converted to Christianity. 

In this course we will explore what it means to “convert”: if it is a one-time process by which change gets effected and is final, or if, on the contrary, it is an ongoing act made of multiple connecting and disconnecting points, a set of negotiations, that involve both acceptance and rejection, reversals, deceit. Could it also be that the converter becomes, in turn, curious about and affected by the beliefs of those he (it’s usually a he) tries to gain over to his religion? We will also look at what conversion implies. The adoption of monotheism after being a practitioner of polytheism has multiple ramifications that have to do with nearly everything we take for granted—ideas about the world that surround us, technology, urbanism, our relationship to others and society, our responsibility to everything that exists. In the Bible, this transformation as it is recounted among the Jewish people (the first monotheists) was a painful process that took many years. What happens when the change is made abruptly, for example? What implications does it have for art, technology, thought?

We will look at how this complex concept gets portrayed, discussed, and represented in different types of media that speak of divergent forms of literacy: textual, pictorial, ritual. While this course will primarily take case studies from the early colonial Americas, students will draw on other geographies for comparative purposes in order to trace the historical transmission of recurrent and inter-connected models of conversion on a global scale.
Lower-division students are welcome to enroll, with the understanding that upper-division courses do require a higher level of critical thinking, reading and writing than most lower-division courses.

The Music Department currently still has seats open in one of our most popular classes, Music 128X, which focuses on the life and works of Beethoven, one of the most influential composers in Western music history. 

Course description:

This course is intended, above all else, to create the circumstances in which we will each independently develop as intimate a relationship as we can with Beethoven’s music. With an open mind and a bit of application, we ought to become well-acquainted with several of his compositions, extremely friendly with others, and perhaps even head over heals in love with a couple of them.
We’ll be seeking to understand this music through attentive listening and close technical description, but also by looking at the historical environments in which it was composed, performed, and heard.
For that reason, we’re going to take a roughly chronological route through Beethoven’s life and works. 


STUDENTS! Please include your SID when emailing questions to musicadvising@berkeley.edu