Summer Session Sociology Courses with Open Seats


SOC  N1H -   13963 -  Session C - INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY FOR PRE-HEALTH STUDENTS 
(M. Jeske) -  TuWeTh 5:00 PM - 6:59 PM

This section of Introduction to Sociology is designed for pre-health professionals and those preparing for the MCAT, but students of all majors are welcome. This course surveys the major theories, concepts, and substantive areas of sociology in ways that are specifically designed to assist undergraduate students pursuing careers in health and medicine. The readings, lectures, and assignments have been chosen with the needs of pre-med students in mind, consisting of units on social relationships, cultures, institutions, stratification, inequalities, and social change, with an emphasis in health inequalities. There are no prerequisites. 

SOC 3AC-  16304 - Session C - PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY: AMERICAN CULTURES
(Felipe Dias)-  TuWeTh 12:00PM - 2:59PM

Why is there inequality? Why do members of some groups tend to enjoy a high quality of life, with access to many opportunities, while others struggle to get by? What leads to social change, and what blocks it? Sociology 3AC uses core sociological ideas to answer these questions. The class provides a general introduction to sociology, beginning with an exploration of classical theories of social cohesion, inequality and transformation. We will consider how much individual success comes from hard work and merit, and how much it is influenced by institutions and laws. We will also learn about the ways in which power can be exercised through race, gender, and sexuality. Throughout, we will consider how our readings relate to current events, and our own lives. 

SOC R1B- 14936 - Session A -  Sociology R1B: Social Inequalities
(J. Kaiser) -  MoTuWeTh 2:00PM - 3:59PM
Sociology R1B fulfills the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement. 

It has three main goals: 1) to assist you in developing a clear, persuasive, and personal prose style in English; 2) to refine and build upon the close reading techniques you practiced in R1A; and 3) to equip you with the skills necessary for writing a research paper—a standard requirement of many upper-division (100-level) courses. In the first part of the course, we study fundamentals: writing analytically; the structure of essays and paragraphs; how to construct arguments; sentence mechanics; and analytical reading techniques. We practice these techniques by writing essays on a range of scholarly texts on the theme of inequality. The second part of the course applies these skills to a longer research paper on a topic that student  choose that requires synthesizing multiple sources to develop a relatively-complex argument. 


SOC 117- 14949 -  Session D - SPORT AS A SOCIAL INSTITUTION
(L. Huang) -  MoTuWeTh 10:00AM - 11:59AM

What counts as a "sport" and what doesn't? Why is basketball unambiguously a sport, but not cheerleading? Why do women in the U.S. play soccer, but not football? Why is cricket a sport for the masses in India, but a sport restricted to the social elite in the U.S.? Why is college sports a multi-billion-dollar industry in the U.S., but barely even an activity for participants, let alone spectators, in other sports-mad countries? The objective of this course is, as the late sociologist Pierre Bourdieu proposed, to explain how the supply of sports (what sports we have, who plays them, how competition is organized) and the demand for sports (how we "consume" sports as fans) comes to be in particular places at particular times. The course is built upon case studies -- including those that address the questions above -- but students will learn how to question and analyze the social order of any part of the sports world.